Wednesday, November 28, 2007

2007 The Final

A reminder: to pass 101, you need to get at least 50% in the Midterms+Final+Quizzes - a good lab grade can't save you. So study hard... and if you have any questions and don't want to ask me in person, ask here. Good luck!
I've added some material to the F02 webpage since the last class - the rest of the clicker questions, some links to background information from a site called "Physics2000", and a partially-marked (MC only) scan of the 2003 final.

29 comments:

Anonymous said...

question about the review sessions the week of december 11.. are they all the same, or does each one cover different aspects of the course?

Scott McIndoe said...

They're different. Mine, for example, is a quick-review-of-the-whole-course, and I will be telling the class tomorrow NOT to attend it because you will have seen it all before - but it ought to be useful for the other sections. The other three sessions will involve doing old exam examples and answering general questions.

Scott McIndoe said...

So why is hexene capable of cis/trans isomerisation, but not 1-hexene, 2-methyl-2-butene, 2-methylpropene, or 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene? (this was the first question in class on Tuesday that just about everyone got wrong). Well, in order to have cis/trans isomers, both C atoms involved in the C=C bond have to have two different groups attached to them, e.g. CH3/H on one end, CH3/H at the other. Any configuration that has two groups the same on either end means that you don't get cis/trans isomers. Try it! 1-Hexene has H2C=, 2-methyl-2-butene has (CH3)2C=, 2-methylpropene has H2C= AND (CH3)2C=, and 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene has (CH3)2C= at both ends.

Scott McIndoe said...

Tuesday December 11 Elliott 168 from 10:00am - 11:30am Dr. McIndoe*
Wednesday December 12 Elliott 168 from 10:00am - 11:30am Dr. Codding
Thursday December 13 Elliott 168 from 10:00am - 11:30am Dr. Chak
Thursday December 13 Elliott 168 from 2:00pm - 3:30pm Dr. Briggs

*Remember - for F02 students, my session will be of limited utility because I'll just be presenting review material that you've seen before.

Anonymous said...

question about old exams in zap: do exams from, say, 1994 still have revelant material, or should we not bother with them? If not, what would be the earliest exams to practice on?

Also, I just wanted to say thank you for a fantastic class; I really enjoyed it.

Scott McIndoe said...

1994 is much too early - 2002 is the earliest you should go (the course changed content considerably then). You will find some irrelevant bits (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for example, some slightly more sophisticated MO examples) but most of the material will make good practice questions.
Thanks for the feedback, I appreciate it.

Anonymous said...

Will the final have an even balance of questions from all topics or will the last chapters be more heavily weighted? Great class by the way.

Scott McIndoe said...

A pretty even balance, with perhaps chapters 25 & 12 slightly over-represented because they weren't examined in the midterms.
Glad you liked the class, thanks.

Anonymous said...

For the final do we need to memorize the structures of the different polymers listed on page 496 of the text book? ie: polyvinyl chloride, polyurethane, nylon 6,6 and so on.

Anonymous said...

In the 2006 exam, I noticed the organic reaction question in the last written question asking the product of the reaction. Do we need to know this??

Scott McIndoe said...

Yes. Fortunately, you only learnt one reaction or so per functional group, so they're not too hard to remember.

Anonymous said...

I'm wondering about a question on the 2006 exam (in the back of the lab manual). It is stated that n=5, l=3, and ml=-2, and we are asked to give the orbital name. I know that this is "5f", but how would we incorporate the ml=-2 orientation into our answer?

Thanks!

Scott McIndoe said...

You don't have to - orbital names don't require ml information (they include all values of ml).

Anonymous said...

any chance you know how we can get our final lab marks?

thanks for the great class by the way!

Scott McIndoe said...

I think they're posted in the second floor hallway - can anyone out there confirm this?
And thanks.

Anonymous said...

yes they are posted in the second floor hallway of elliot but the final marks arent posted until the 14th.

Anonymous said...

Could you please post the answers for the 2006 multiple choice questions? Or maybe anyone out there who can share the answers?
I would really appreciate it, Thanks

Anonymous said...

Does the addition of sulphuric acid to 2-butene (cis or trans) produce an alcohol? (2-butanol).

If so, why would it not produce a saturated hydrocarbon? (butane + oxgen)

Scott McIndoe said...

Alkene + H2O (in presence of sulfuric acid as catalyst) produces alcohol; hydrogenation will make alkanes. You could write a balanced equation for alkene + H2O -> alkane + O2, but if you check out the change in enthalphy for this reaction, it will be unfavourable. You'll find out more about what makes reactiosn go (or not) in 102.

Anonymous said...

A question on a bought practice exam:

The electron residing in the 2px orbital of an electronically excited hydrogen atom is promoted to the 4dxy orbital by absorption of a photon of laser light. The longest wavelength of light that can be emitted by the resulting electronically excited hydrogen atom is:

a) Cannot be determined
b) 1875nm
c) 97nm
d) 187.5nm
e) 485nm

When it asks to calculate the "longest" wavelength, what values do we pick for n-initial and n-final?

Scott McIndoe said...

2px is smoke; the history of the electron is not of interest. Similarly, ANY n=4 orbital is the same in energy for an H atom. So you just have to decide - what is going to be the lowest energy emission possible (since E = hc/lambda)? This will be the smallest drop, so n=4 (initial) -> n=3 (final).

Dean said...

Hey,
Great course! the lectures were all interesting and the tests were fair - wish you were teaching second semester.
I have a chemistry question (not related to the course). I don't know if you can answer it, but maybe you've thought about it before:
I was wondering about lifespan of recordable media - CDRs & DVDRs. It sounds like a lot depends on the quality of the manufacturer, but as for the chemistry of the disks; if the disks are kept out of the light, low humidity, constant temperature, assuming no physical wear and tear etc... is there any reason for the disk surface to degrade after, say, 5 - 10 years. After all, the data is etched underneath a layer of plastic..
I guess it's a hard to answer question but do you have any opinion?

Scott McIndoe said...

Thanks Dean.
Interesting question. The lifetime of optical media has to do less with the plastic and more with the dye (which can chemically degrade over time thermally or photochemically) and the reflective layer (if you want longevity, use the gold ones - nice and inert), I think. I suspect if you bought good quality discs and stored them carefully, they'd outlast you: but by then, many new generations of storage media will have been employed anyway. Think of how laughable a 3.5" floppy disc is now - that's how we'll be regarding CDs & DVDs in 15 years time.

Mike Hunt said...

When will our marks be posted from the final? Thanks! I really enjoyed the class!

Scott McIndoe said...

They're posted on the course website, "Mike"; glad you liked the class.

Fragmentadora de Papel said...

Hello. This post is likeable, and your blog is very interesting, congratulations :-). I will add in my blogroll =). If possible gives a last there on my blog, it is about the Fragmentadora de Papel, I hope you enjoy. The address is http://fragmentadora-de-papel.blogspot.com. A hug.

Anonymous said...

9 am - Fred

Fred said...

9 am

Joe said...

9.45